Team fundraisers a great way to battle rising costs in youth sports

The costs of uniforms, equipment and league fees can add up quickly, but players can work together to raise money so they can all afford to play.
The costs of uniforms, equipment and league fees can add up quickly, but players can work together to raise money so they can all afford to play.

There’s no question that the costs of playing youth and amateur sports have increased significantly in recent years to comply with frequent league rule changes, mandatory safety precautions and an increasingly competitive standard among young athletes.

While it’s certainly an extreme example, Fran Dicari dished out almost $12,000 in 2011 alone to pay for his three children to play sports all year, according to the The Huffington Post.

Most parents and athletes won’t need to spend nearly that much money to be a contributing member of various teams, but the costs of necessary products like catcher’s equipment, baseball bats and gloves can add up very quickly.

Since the games can’t be played without these items that don’t always fit into every team or player’s budget, oftentimes, teammates will work together to raise the money they need to play.

In Wisconsin, the Muskego Warriors youth baseball club is in desperate need of a new field, according to MyMuskegoNow.com. President of the youth team, James Prusinski, explained to the source that there is a handful of teams playing on a limited number of baseball diamonds in the area.

The Warriors took the initiative to find a solution, and with a combination of funding from donations, fundraising and corporate sponsors, they just may be able to come up with the $70,000 to $75,000 it will cost to build a new ballpark.

Over the next few months, the Warriors will be collecting financial support through a series of fundraisers, and will be required to update the town’s Parks and Recreation Board on their progress each month. By the end of July, the source said that the board will review how much funding the team has collected, and if the number is sufficient, the new field could be ready by the beginning of next season.

Fundraising doesn’t need to be limited to such large products. Young players can work together to collect money that can help them pay for items like bats and uniforms.

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